OCCPR: A Leader in Cancer Proteomics and Proteogenomics

The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is to improve prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by enhancing the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance proteome and proteogenome science and technology development through community resources (data and reagent), and accelerate the translation of molecular findings into the clinic. This is achieved through OCCPR-supported programs such as the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), partnerships with Federal agencies, and collaborations with international organizations/institutions.

The International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

Learn about ICPC and how the consortium is breaking down silos to advance proteogenomic cancer research worldwide.

New Funding Opportunity: Tissue Purchase Order Acquisitions

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is expanding its basic and translational research programs that rely heavily on sufficient availability of high quality, well annotated biospecimens suitable for use in genomic and proteomic studies.  The NCI’s overarching goal with such programs is to improve the ability to diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.


New Funding Opportunity: Biospecimen Core Resource

The purpose of this notice is to notify the community that the National Cancer Institute's (NCI’s) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is seeking sources to establish a Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR), capable of receiving, qualifying, processing, and distributing annotated biospecimens.


Pharmacodynamic Assay Panel for Monitoring Phospho-Signaling Networks

The DNA damage response (DDR) is a highly regulated signal transduction network that orchestrates the temporal and spatial organization of protein complexes required to repair (or tolerate) DNA damage (e.g., nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining, post-replication repair).


CPTAC Accelerates Precision Proteomics Biomedical Research

The accurate quantitation of proteins or peptides using Mass Spectrometry (MS) is gaining prominence in the biomedical research community as an alternative method for analyte measurement. The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) investigators have been at the forefront in the promotion of reproducible MS techniques, through the development and application of standardized proteomic methods for protein quantitation on biologically relevant samples.


AACR 2015: Major Symposium: Proteogenomic Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Tumor Samples

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting
Wednesday, April 22, 2015, 10:00 AM -12:00 PM
Room 121, Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA
CME/CE Hours: 2


Development of Best practices document for Peptide Standards

The Assay Development Working Group (ADWG) of the CPTAC Program is currently drafting a document to propose best practices for generation, quantification, storage, and handling of peptide standards used for mass spectrometry-based assays, as well as interpretation of quantitative proteomic data based on peptide standards. The ADWG is seeking input from commercial entities that provide peptide standards for mass spectrometry-based assays or that perform amino acid analysis.


CPTAC Proteomics Data on UCSC Genome Browser

The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium scientists are working together with the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genomics Institute to provide public access to cancer proteomics data via the UCSC Genome Browser. This effort extends accessibility of the CPTAC data to more researchers and provides an additional level of analysis to assist the cancer biology community.


Investigating RAS Signaling in Cancer

CPTAC expertise has been charged to develop RAS specific targeted proteomic assays to study the important pathways of human cancer.

The oncogene RAS is linked to 30 percent of human cancers, but the search for a targeted therapy for RAS has remained elusive. To advance our understanding of this oncogene and to develop improved targeted therapies against RAS pathway, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched a RAS Initiative.


Computational Omics Pre-Awardees

The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is pleased to announce the pre-awardees of the Computational Omics solicitation. Working with NVIDIA Foundation's Compute the Cure initiative and Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., the NCI, through this solicitation, seeks to leverage computational efforts to provide tools for the mining and interpretation of large-scale publicly available ‘omics’ datasets.


CPTAC Investigators Discuss Research Insights and Perspectives as part of ASBMB Journal Club - 12 Nov

On Wednesday, November 12, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EST, Daniel Liebler, PhD (Vanderbilt University) and Karin Rodland, PhD (Pacific Northwestern National Laboratory) and Ruedi Aebersold, PhD (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) will share their research insight as part of the ASBMB Journal Club.  Both Doctors Liebler and Rodland are Principal Investigators in the NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium.


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