ICPC Korea University Team Proteogenomically Characterizes Early-Onset Gastric Cancer

The incidence of early-onset gastric cancer (EOGC), a type of cancer that occurs in younger patients and found throughout the stomach, is markedly elevated in the Republic of Korea. As a country with the highest rates worldwide in both sexes, there is a need to identify molecular signatures that can be used to diagnose and treat EOGC.

Proteogenomics Approach Identifies DPYSL3 Gene in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Claudin-Low (CLOW) tumors are classified as a subset of triple-negative breast cancers and account for a minority of breast cancer cases. But until now, there has been little study of their unique biological features. Understanding the biology of CLOW tumors is important for designing targeted therapeutic agents to treat highly aggressive breast cancers.

Final Announcement: PrecisionFDA NCI-CPTAC Multi-omics Challenge Ends in Four Days

The NCI-CPTAC Multi-omics Enabled Sample Mislabeling Correction Challenge sub-challenge 2 closes on December 19 at 07:59:59 UTC. Just four days left to submit your computational algorithms. Remember, if you did not participate in sub-challenge 1, you can still participate in sub-challenge 2. Thank you for your participation and please continue to post any questions or concerns on the discussion forum.

CPTAC Contributes to In-Depth Profiling of CAR T-Cell Signaling

CAR T-cells, which are immune cells reprogrammed to fight cancer, are promising novel cancer therapies to treat certain types of tumors. But, the underlying biological pathways that lead to remission or toxicity are not fully understood. In a study published in Science Signaling, CPTAC investigator (part of the Proteogenomic Translational Research Centers) Dr. Amanda Paulovich, her team, and fellow researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center used proteomics to profile signaling events in two different, clinically relevant CARs using cell and mouse models.

CPTAC Contributes to the Identification of a Novel Pharmacodynamic Biomarker for Clinical Trial Use

Several ongoing Phase I clinical trials are assessing the safety and tolerability of ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-Related) inhibitors when administered alone or in combination with existing therapies. ATM and ATR are attractive therapeutic targets in oncology due to defective DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms found in many human cancers and are thought to resolve DNA damage in cancer cells and promote tumor regression.

PrecisionFDA NCI-CPTAC Multi-Omics Challenge Updates

The security of precisionFDA users’ personal information and data is of critical importance. To strengthen the safeguards already in place, precisionFDA will be introducing several changes to achieve compliance with the FedRAMP and FISMA Moderate security standards. These changes will take effect during a service outage on the site between 5PM October 31 and 5PM EDT November 1.

CPTAC Releases UCEC, ccRCC Discovery Data and Other Study Datasets

The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is releasing the latest proteomic discovery datasets for Uterine Corpus Endometrial Carcinoma (UCEC) and Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC). CPTAC has previously demonstrated how proteogenomics reveals new insights into cancer biology. Because of the scientific progress already made by the program, CPTAC is leveraging its investment in proteogenomics by characterizing UCEC and ccRCC and providing publicly available proteomic data for these latest tumor types.

In addition, CPTAC has also released data on the NCI-7 cell line panel and the use of SEER (surveillance, epidemiology and end results) repository tissues for cancer proteomic studies.

CPTAC Develops Fit-for-Purpose Immuno-MRM Assay for FANCD2 Protein Modification Involved in DNA Damage

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. The FA pathway consists of a network of 21 proteins that is specialized for repairing DNA inter-strand cross-links. Identification of monoubiquitylation (or similar) defects in this network provides an opportunity for therapeutic targeting with a high-throughput, quantitative mechanism. CPTAC investigator Dr. Amanda Paulovich and her research team at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center demonstrated the utility of an immuno-multiple reaction monitoring (iMRM) assay to quantify the unmodified and monoubiquitinated protein isoforms and peptides unique to FANCD2.

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