CPTAC Develops Fit-for-Purpose Immuno-MRM Assay for FANCD2 Protein Modification Involved in DNA Damage

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. The FA pathway consists of a network of 21 proteins that is specialized for repairing DNA inter-strand cross-links. Identification of monoubiquitylation (or similar) defects in this network provides an opportunity for therapeutic targeting with a high-throughput, quantitative mechanism. CPTAC investigator Dr. Amanda Paulovich and her research team at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center demonstrated the utility of an immuno-multiple reaction monitoring (iMRM) assay to quantify the unmodified and monoubiquitinated protein isoforms and peptides unique to FANCD2.

Cancer Has No Borders – NCI Video Release Highlights the International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

The Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announces the release of a video titled, “International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium (ICPC)”. Launched during the 2018 Human Proteome Organization World Congress, the video is a call-to-action for both current and potential consortium members to share data and develop a cancer atlas representative of the diversity of people with cancer around the world.

The precisionFDA NCI-CPTAC Multi-Omics Challenge is Open for Submissions

The National Cancer Institute in partnership with the Food and Drug Administration is pleased to announce the launch of the precisionFDA NCI-CPTAC Multi-Omics Challenge. The aim of this crowd-sourced, cloud-based data challenge is to incentivize the development and evaluation of novel computational algorithms that can accurately detect and correct mislabeled samples using rich multi-omics data. The challenge runs on the precisionFDA platform, with the ultimate goal of producing an open-source product that can be incorporated into a quality-management system to reduce mislabeling errors. An immediate outcome of the challenge is a flagship manuscript that highlights the challenge data, questions, design, and outcomes.

CPTAC and FDA Discuss Upcoming Computational Challenge in the Journal Nature Medicine

Multidimensional multi-omics datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), and similar initiatives are becoming a powerful approach to understanding the molecular basis of disease and accelerating the translation of new discoveries to patient care. While there is value in multi-omics technologies and datasets to help reach a deeper understanding of a disease and ultimately help a physician and patient determine the most appropriate treatment option, sample mislabeling presents as a roadblock that can occur in data production and analysis pipelines involving data-rich, large-scale omics studies.

CPTAC Evaluates SEER Repository Tissues as a Resource for Population-Based Cancer Proteomic Studies

Next-generation mass spectrometry (NGMS) has become a powerful tool for protein identification and quantification from prospectively collected fresh frozen or optimal cutting temperature embedded specimens. However, limitations due to supply, accessibility, and delay of clinical information and outcomes from prospectively collected specimens allow researchers to consider the use of banked specimens.

Get Ready to Join the precisionFDA NCI-CPTAC Multi-Omics Challenge

In biomedical research, sample mislabeling or incorrect annotation has been a long-standing problem that contributes to irreproducible results and invalid conclusions. These problems are particularly prevalent in large scale multi-omics studies where human errors could arise during sample transferring, sample tracking, large-scale data generation, and data sharing/management. 

Reminder: NCI Requests Cancer Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization

In an effort to improve rigor and reproducibility, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for monoclonal antibody production and distribution to the scientific community. The program from The Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research provides well-characterized

Pages