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News and Announcements

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Omics Workshop Videocast Available

The Omics Integration in Biology and Medicine Workshop, held on June 19th and 20th is now available for viewing on NIH Videocast: Day 1 and Day 2.  The workshop focused on the emerging field of integrating disparate omic data from genomics, proteomics, glycomics, etc. in order to better understand key biological processes and also improve clinical practice.


Omics Integration in Biology and Medicine Workshop

The focus of this meeting will be on the emerging field of integrating disparate omic data from genomics, proteomics, glycomics, etc. in order to better understand key biological processes and also improve clinical practice. Discussants will focus on identifying the technical and biological barriers in omic integration, with solutions to build a consensus towards data integration in bioscience and to better define phenotypes.


NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization

In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

Submissions will be accepted through July 9, 2012.


New Visiting Scholars Program at Frederick National Laboratory

The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research is now accepting Expressions of Interest to its new Visiting Scholars Program (VSP). VSP is a unique opportunity for researchers to work on important cancer and AIDS projects with teams of scientists at the only federal national laboratory in the United States devoted exclusively to biomedical research.


NIH Common Fund - Disruptive Proteomics Technologies - Challenges and Opportunities

This Request for Information (RFI) is directed toward determining how best to accelerate research in disruptive proteomics technologies.

The Disruptive Proteomics Technologies (DPT) Working Group of the NIH Common Fund wishes to identify gaps and opportunities in current technologies and methodologies related to proteome-wide measurements.  For the purposes of this RFI, “disruptive” is defined as very rapid, very significant gains, similar to the "disruptive" technology development that occurred in DNA sequencing technology.


Open Access Data Takes Center Stage

NCI’s Cancer Bulletin highlight a recent conversation with Drs. Henry Rodriguez and Christopher Kinsinger of OCCPR focusing on Open Data Access in Proteomics.

Click here to link to the article.


NCI's Proteome Characterization Centers Announced

The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announces the launch of a Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC). CPTAC is a comprehensive, coordinated team effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of robust, quantitative, proteomic technologies and workflows.


Reagent Target Request for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization

NCI's Antibody Characterization Program provides reagents and other critical resources to support protein/peptide measurements and analysis. In an effort to produce and distribute well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, the program is seeking cancer related protein targets for antibody production and characterization for distribution to the research community.

Submission Period: May 20, 2011 - July 1, 2011.


NCI, NHLBI, FDA, AACC, and CMS Collaborate in Advancing Proteomics Regulatory Science

Despite great strides in proteomics and the growing number of articles citing the discovery of potential biomarkers, the actual rate of introduction of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved protein analytes has been relatively unchanged over the past 10 years. One of reasons for the lack of new protein-based biomarkers approved has been a lack of information and understanding by the proteomics research community to the regulatory process used by the FDA. To address this issue, Dr.


Open Source Software Tool Skyline Reaches Key Agreement with Mass Spectrometer Vendors

The full proteomics analysis of a small tumor sample (similar in mass to a few grains of rice) produces well over 500 megabytes of unprocessed "raw" data when analyzed on a mass spectrometer (MS). Thus, for every proteomics experiment there is a vast amount of raw data that must be analyzed and interrogated in order to extract biological information. Moreover, the raw data output from different MS vendors are generally in different formats inhibiting the ability of labs to productively work together.


Evolution of Clinical Proteomics and its Role in Medicine

NCI's Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research authored a review of the current state of clinical proteomics in the peer-reviewed Journal of Proteome Research. The review highlights outcomes from the CPTC program and also provides a thorough overview of the different technologies that have pushed the field forward. Additionally, the review provides a vision for moving the field forward through linking advances in genomic and proteomic analysis to develop new, molecularly targeted interventions.


CPTC and KIST Join Efforts to Solve Complex Proteomic Issues

The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer (CPTC) initiative at the National Institutes of Health has entered into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST). This MOU promotes proteomic technology optimization and standards implementation in large-scale international programs.


National Cancer Institute and American Association for Clinical Chemistry Partner to Bridge the Gap

The National Cancer Institute, through its Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer (CPTC) initiative has entered into a memorandum of understanding with the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) to join forces to promote and educate the clinical chemistry community in the area of proteomic standards and technology advances.


Research Output from CPTC highlighted in recent articles

In the special December issue of Proteomics Clinical Applications , two articles focus directly on scientific outputs from CPTC. A Viewpoint article, authored by Participants of a Wellcome Trust/EBI meeting and retreat (Patterson et al.), advocate the leveraging of the mock 510 (k) documents developed by CPTC for further development in order to better understand regulatory need.


NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force Workshop Provides Guidance for Analytical Validation of Protein-based Multiplex Assays

An NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force (IOTF) Molecular Diagnostics Workshop was held on October 30, 2008 in Cambridge, MA, to discuss requirements for analytical validation of protein-based multiplex technologies in the context of its intended use. This workshop developed through NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative and the FDA focused on technology-specific analytical validation processes to be addressed prior to use in clinical settings. In making this workshop unique, a case study approach was used to discuss issues related to


An Interview with Dr. Ann Gronowski, the President-Elect of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry

Q1. What are some of the key goals for AACC and its members in 2011?


CPTC and NIST-sponsored Yeast Reference Material Now Publicly Available

The yeast protein extract (RM8323) developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) under the auspices of NCI's CPTC initiative is currently available to the public at https://www-s.nist.gov/srmors/view_detail.cfm?srm=8323. The yeast proteome offers researchers a unique biological reference material. RM8323 is the most extensively characterized complex biological proteome and the only one associated with several large-scale studies to estimate protein abundance across a wide concentration range.


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