OCCPR: A Leader in Cancer Proteomics and Proteogenomics

The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is to improve prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by enhancing the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance proteome and proteogenome science and technology development through community resources (data and reagent), and accelerate the translation of molecular findings into the clinic. This is achieved through OCCPR-supported programs such as the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), partnerships with Federal agencies, and collaborations with international organizations/institutions.

The International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

Learn about ICPC and how the consortium is breaking down silos to advance proteogenomic cancer research worldwide.

CPTAC Teams Up With UniProt!

UniProt, the leading online protein reference library, has teamed up with CPTAC!  Now, search results for your protein-of-interest will include links to the CPTAC Assay Portal for relevant peptides and assay protocols, while giving CPTAC users all the rich functional annotation in UniProt!  


CPTAC Researchers Develop Novel RAS-Antibodies for the Cancer Research Community through the NCI RAS-Initiative

RAS gene mutations and their pathways have  stymied cancer researchers for decades.  RAS-driven cancers make up more than 30% of all human cancers due to their association with uncontrollable cell growth, death-signal evasion, and drug resistance.  In 2014, the National Cancer Institu


cBioPortal Gets a New Addition: CPTAC Researchers Integrate Mass-Spectrometry Data Into Genomic Platform

Genomics platform cBioPortal offers a “biologist-friendly” resource for querying mutations, copy number variations and gene expression. It contains data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) which includes proteomics data in the form of arrays that use antibodies to track protein levels. CPTAC mass spectrometry-based proteomics, however, has more information than the arrays provide.


Multi-Omics Data Integration Special Issue Features Research from CPTAC Investigators

The Journal of Molecular & Cellular Proteomics has released a special issue this month (August 2019) on Multi-Omics Integration.  The issue sets out to show how multi-omics research is integral to the understanding of biological systems.  It touts work from several of our CPTAC investigators who share their cutting


More Validated Targeted MS-based Assays Released on the NCI Proteomics Assay Portal!

New assays have been released today!  CPTAC and researchers from the University of Victoria – Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre just released over 130 quantitative, fit-for-purpose, multiplexed mouse multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry (MS)-based  plasma assays for public use on NCI’s Proteomic (CPTAC) Assay Portal


CPTAC Researchers Develop New Technique for Mapping the O-Glycoproteome

CPTAC researchers at John Hopkins University School of Medicine have developed a technique to reliably identify o-linked glycosylation sites and site-specific glycans with core 1 structures.  Before you dust off


Low Cell Input? No Problem! CPTAC Researchers Develop Low Sample Input Proteomics Protocol

Proteomic profiling often entails using a large sample input to explore the dynamic nature of protein expression and regulation. However, there are instances when researchers have the opposite due to prior methodology such as fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) or when dealing with patient samples.


Amsterdam UMC Joins the ICPC

June 13th, 2019 marked the addition of our 33rd institution to the International Cancer Proteogenomic Consortium (ICPC).  We are pleased to include Amsterdam UMC as a participant in the global effort to accelerate cancer research.


The National Cancer Center - Korea (NCC-K) Joins the International Cancer Proteogenomic Consortium (ICPC)

The National Cancer Center - Korea (NCC-K) joins the International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium (ICPC) global partnership.  The NCC-K has joined the ranks of 31 institutions in 12 countries around the world that have previously made this commitment with the


Proteomic Dataset Release of the CPTAC and CBTTC Collaborative Pediatric Brain Tumor Pilot Study

While it’s a common misconception that all tumors in the brain are the same, there are more than 120 subtypes of brain cancers with very diverse features and diagnosis.


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