OCCPR: A Leader in Cancer Proteomics and Proteogenomics

The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is to improve prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by enhancing the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance proteome and proteogenome science and technology development through community resources (data and reagent), and accelerate the translation of molecular findings into the clinic. This is achieved through OCCPR-supported programs such as the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), partnerships with Federal agencies, and collaborations with international organizations/institutions.

The International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

Learn about ICPC and how the consortium is breaking down silos to advance proteogenomic cancer research worldwide.

Open Access Data Takes Center Stage

NCI’s Cancer Bulletin highlight a recent conversation with Drs. Henry Rodriguez and Christopher Kinsinger of OCCPR focusing on Open Data Access in Proteomics.

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NCI's Proteome Characterization Centers Announced

The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announces the launch of a Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC). CPTAC is a comprehensive, coordinated team effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the...


Reagent Target Request for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization

NCI's Antibody Characterization Program provides reagents and other critical resources to support protein/peptide measurements and analysis. In an effort to produce and distribute well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community,...


NCI, NHLBI, FDA, AACC, and CMS Collaborate in Advancing Proteomics Regulatory Science

Despite great strides in proteomics and the growing number of articles citing the discovery of potential biomarkers, the actual rate of introduction of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved protein analytes has been relatively unchanged over the past 10 years. One of reasons for the lack...


Open Source Software Tool Skyline Reaches Key Agreement with Mass Spectrometer Vendors

The full proteomics analysis of a small tumor sample (similar in mass to a few grains of rice) produces well over 500 megabytes of unprocessed "raw" data when analyzed on a mass spectrometer (MS). Thus, for every proteomics experiment there is a vast amount of raw data that must be analyzed and...


Evolution of Clinical Proteomics and its Role in Medicine

NCI's Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research authored a review of the current state of clinical proteomics in the peer-reviewed Journal of Proteome Research. The review highlights outcomes from the CPTC program and also provides a thorough overview of the different technologies that have...


CPTC and KIST Join Efforts to Solve Complex Proteomic Issues

The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer (CPTC) initiative at the National Institutes of Health has entered into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Korea...


Research Output from CPTC highlighted in recent articles

In the special December issue of Proteomics Clinical Applications , two articles focus directly on scientific outputs from CPTC. A Viewpoint article, authored by Participants of a Wellcome Trust/EBI meeting and retreat...


NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force Workshop Provides Guidance for Analytical Validation of Protein-based Multiplex Assays

An NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force (IOTF) Molecular Diagnostics Workshop was held on October 30, 2008 in Cambridge, MA, to discuss requirements for analytical validation of protein-based multiplex technologies in the context of its intended use. This workshop developed through NCI's...


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