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OCCPR: A Leader in Cancer Proteomics and Proteogenomics

The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is to improve prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by enhancing the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance proteome and proteogenome science and technology development through community resources (data and reagent), and accelerate the translation of molecular findings into the clinic. This is achieved through OCCPR-supported programs such as the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), partnerships with Federal agencies, and collaborations with international organizations/institutions.

The International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

Learn about ICPC and how the consortium is breaking down silos to advance proteogenomic cancer research worldwide.

Vanderbilt University Study Creates New Roadmap for Cellular Activity

Human cells are constructed in large part from proteins whose activity can be altered by the incorporation of oxygen in what are known as redox modifications.

Jing Yang, Ph.D., and colleagues are working to identify oxygen modifications at the cellular level that can create a pathway to certain diseases. (photo by Susan Urmy)


Computational Omics Funding Opportunity

The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) and the NVIDIA Foundation are pleased to announce funding opportunities in the fight against cancer. Each organization has launched a request for proposals (RFP) that will collectively fund up to $2 million to help to develop a new generation of data-intensive scientific tools to find new ways to treat cancer.


NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal

In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assays.  This community web-based repository for well-characterized quantitative proteomic assays currently consists of 456 unique peptide assays to 282 unique proteins and serves as a public reso


CPTAC researchers report first large-scale integrated proteomic and genomic analysis of a human cancer

Investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) who comprehensively analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples, have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples are expressed at the protein level. The integration of proteomic and genomic data, or proteogenomics, provides a more comprehensive view of the biological features that drive cancer than genomic analysis alone and may help identify the most important targets for cancer detection and intervention.


CPTAC Releases Largest-Ever Ovarian Cancer Proteome Dataset from Previously Genome Characterized Tumors

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have just released a comprehensive dataset of the proteomic analysis of high grade serous ovarian tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).  This is one of the largest public datasets covering the proteome, phosphoproteome and glycoproteome with complementary deep genomic sequencing data on the same tumor.


Draft Map of Human Proteome Published

In a recently published article in the journal Nature, researchers have developed a draft map of the human proteome.  Striving for the protein equivalent of the Human Genome Project, an international team of researchers has created an initial catalog of the human proteome. In total, using 30 different human tissues, the researchers identified proteins encoded by 17,294 genes, which is approximately 84 percent of all of the genes in the human genome predicted to encode proteins.


Tumor Cold Ischemia

In a recently published manuscript in the journal of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, researchers from the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) investigated the effect of cold ischemia on the proteome of fresh frozen tumors.


CPTAC Releases Largest-Ever Breast Cancer Proteome Dataset from Previously Genome Characterized Tumors

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and  phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).


NCI Requests Cancer Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization

In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

Submissions will be accepted through July 11, 2014.


Assays without Borders

CPTAC researchers, partner with international labs to demonstrate the ability of targeted mass spectrometry–based assays to reproducibly quantify human proteins across labs, countries and continents in a recently published journal article. In a landmark paper appearing in the Dec.


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