OCCPR: A Leader in Cancer Proteomics and Proteogenomics

The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is to improve prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by enhancing the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance proteome and proteogenome science and technology development through community resources (data and reagent), and accelerate the translation of molecular findings into the clinic. This is achieved through OCCPR-supported programs such as the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), partnerships with Federal agencies, and collaborations with international organizations/institutions.

The International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

Learn about ICPC and how the consortium is breaking down silos to advance proteogenomic cancer research worldwide.

Development of Best practices document for Peptide Standards

The Assay Development Working Group (ADWG) of the CPTAC Program is currently drafting a document to propose best practices for generation, quantification, storage, and handling of peptide standards used for mass spectrometry-based assays, as well as interpretation of quantitative proteomic data based on peptide standards. The ADWG is seeking input from commercial entities that provide peptide standards for mass spectrometry-based assays or that perform amino acid analysis.


CPTAC Proteomics Data on UCSC Genome Browser

The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium scientists are working together with the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genomics Institute to provide public access to cancer proteomics data via the UCSC Genome Browser. This effort extends accessibility of the CPTAC data to more researchers and provides an additional level of analysis to assist the cancer biology community.


Investigating RAS Signaling in Cancer

CPTAC expertise has been charged to develop RAS specific targeted proteomic assays to study the important pathways of human cancer.

The oncogene RAS is linked to 30 percent of human cancers, but the search for a targeted therapy for RAS has remained elusive. To advance our understanding of this oncogene and to develop improved targeted therapies against RAS pathway, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched a RAS Initiative.


Computational Omics Pre-Awardees

The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is pleased to announce the pre-awardees of the Computational Omics solicitation. Working with NVIDIA Foundation's Compute the Cure initiative and Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., the NCI, through this solicitation, seeks to leverage computational efforts to provide tools for the mining and interpretation of large-scale publicly available ‘omics’ datasets.


CPTAC Investigators Discuss Research Insights and Perspectives as part of ASBMB Journal Club - 12 Nov

On Wednesday, November 12, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EST, Daniel Liebler, PhD (Vanderbilt University) and Karin Rodland, PhD (Pacific Northwestern National Laboratory) and Ruedi Aebersold, PhD (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) will share their research insight as part of the ASBMB Journal Club.  Both Doctors Liebler and Rodland are Principal Investigators in the NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium.


Proteomic Research Funding Opportunity

To expand the understanding of how cells sense and respond to changes in their physical environment, the NCI is seeking to perform proteomic assays on the panel of cell lines grown on a variety of substrates. These assays will provide insight into changes in protein levels or phosphorylation changes that could reflect the activity of mechano-transduction pathways.


PODCAST: From Lost in Translation to Paradise Found: Enabling Protein Biomarker Method Transfer by Mass Spectrometry

Translation of novel biomarkers into clinical care for the evaluation of therapeutic safety and efficacy has been slow, partly attributable to the cost and complexity of immunoassay development.  The potential for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to streamline the translation of novel protein biomarkers is profound.  Drs. Henry Rodriguez and Andrew Hoofnagle discuss what the future may be for clinical proteomics. This is an American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) podcast.


CPTAC Contributes to Healthdata.gov

Recently, proteomic data generated by the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) funded by National Cancer Institute (NCI) was highlighted to the wider research community at Healthdata.govHealthdata.gov aims to make health data more accessible to entrepreneurs, researchers, and policy makers in the hopes of improving health outcomes for all.


Vanderbilt University Study Creates New Roadmap for Cellular Activity

Human cells are constructed in large part from proteins whose activity can be altered by the incorporation of oxygen in what are known as redox modifications.

Jing Yang, Ph.D., and colleagues are working to identify oxygen modifications at the cellular level that can create a pathway to certain diseases. (photo by Susan Urmy)


Computational Omics Funding Opportunity

The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) and the NVIDIA Foundation are pleased to announce funding opportunities in the fight against cancer. Each organization has launched a request for proposals (RFP) that will collectively fund up to $2 million to help to develop a new generation of data-intensive scientific tools to find new ways to treat cancer.


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