OCCPR: A Leader in Cancer Proteomics and Proteogenomics

The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is to improve prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by enhancing the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance proteome and proteogenome science and technology development through community resources (data and reagent), and accelerate the translation of molecular findings into the clinic. This is achieved through OCCPR-supported programs such as the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), partnerships with Federal agencies, and collaborations with international organizations/institutions.

The International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium

Learn about ICPC and how the consortium is breaking down silos to advance proteogenomic cancer research worldwide.

CPTAC Investigators Identify Rogue Breast Tumor Proteins That Point To Potential Drug Therapies

For patients with difficult-to-treat cancers, doctors increasingly rely on genomic testing of tumors to identify errors in the DNA that indicate a tumor can be targeted by existing therapies. But this approach overlooks another potential marker — rogue proteins — that may be driving cancer cells and also could be targeted with existing treatments.


Fred Hutch's Paulovich Laboratory to Lead Protein Assay Work for National Beau Biden Cancer Moonshot

The Applied Proteogenomics OrganizationaL Learning and Outcomes (APOLLO) network, which is a partnership among the National Cancer Institute, Department of Defense, and Department of Veterans Affairs, has tapped the Paulovich Laboratory at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center to create a panel of tests to measure key proteins that can serve as markers for tumors. The effort could ultimately lead to treatments that are more specifically targeted to a patient’s distinct type of cancer.
 


PODCAST: Dr. Warren Kibbe & Dr. Henry Rodriguez: Working toward a cure for cancer

The Obama administration's cancer moonshot has brought three Federal agencies together.


At the United Nation Foundation's Social Good Summit, Vice President Biden Announces New Cancer Moonshot International Cooperation and Investments

This week, Vice President Joe Biden announced progress on his global vision for the Cancer Moonshot.  Announced were 10 new Memoranda of Understanding or Memoranda of Cooperation for international cancer research and care, as well as new efforts in the emerging scientific areas of precision oncology, the funding of collaborative research centers to address cancer disparities in low- and middle- income (LMIC) countries, and a strengthening of existing U.S. bilateral science and technology engagements around cancer.
 


University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre Partners with CPTAC

University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre, a leader in proteomic technology development, has partnered with the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) to make targeted proteomic assays accessible to the community through NCI’s CPTAC Assay Portal (https://assays.cancer.gov).


White House Office of the Vice President Announces New Memorandum of Understanding in Clinical Proteogenomics Between the United States and Australia

The White House Office of the Vice President has announced the signing of three Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) that will make available an unprecedented international dataset to advance cancer research and care.


Applied Proteogenomics OrganizationaL Learning and Outcomes (APOLLO) Network

July 11, 2016 — In the spirit of collaboration inspired by the Vice President’s Cancer Moonshot, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the Department of Defense (DoD), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) are proud to announce a new tri-agency coalition that will help cancer patients by enabling their oncologists to more rapidly and accurately identify effective drugs to treat cancer based on a patient’s unique proteogenomic profile.


Proteogenomics Identifies New Biology in Ovarian Cancer and Insights to Diagnosis, Treatment

June 29, 2016 — In what is believed to be the largest study of its kind, scientists at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) led a multi-institutional collaborative project that comprehensively examined the collections of proteins in the tumors of 169 ovarian cancer patients to identify critical proteins expressed by their tumors. By integrating their findings about the collection of proteins (the proteome) with information already known about the tumors’ genetic data (the genome), the investigators report the poten


First Large-Scale Proteogenomic Study of Breast Cancer Provides Insight into Potential Therapeutic Targets

News Release: May 25, 2016 — Building on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, a multi-institutional team of scientists has completed the first large-scale “proteogenomic” study of breast cancer, linking DNA mutations to protein signaling and helping pinpoint the genes that drive cancer.


Notice of Changes to RFA-CA-15-022 and Pre-Application Webinar

The National Cancer Institute will hold a public Pre-Application webinar on Wednesday, January 13, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. (EST) for the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) RFA-CA-15-022 entitled “Proteogenomic Translational Research Centers for Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (U01).”


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